SANITATION 

Almost a billion (946 million) people in the world defecate in the open BECAUSE THEY LACK ACCESS TO A SANITARY OR ADEQUATE TOILET. (WHO/UNICEF, 2015)

DISEASE

If everyone everywhere had clean water, the number of diarrhoeal deaths would be cut by 34%. (2014)

ACCESS

ACCESS 

42% of healthcare facilities in Africa do not have access to safe water. (WHO/UNICEF, 2015)

Without the technology and funding to access natural resources, much of Africa’s clean water is not accessible.

DEATH

DEATH

Every minute a newborn baby dies from infection caused by a lack of safe water and an unclean environment. (WHO, 2015)

HYGIENE

HYGIENE

$28.4 billion of investment is needed every year to reach everyone everywhere with clean water, adequate toilets and good hygiene by 2030. (World Bank, 2016)

The simple act of handwashing can reduce diarrheal diseases by up to 40%.  It is considered to be the single most cost-effective health intervention in the developing world. 

WOMEN

WOMEN

Women in sub-Saharan Africa spend an estimated 40 billion hours per year collecting water – equivalent to a year’s worth of labour by the entire workforce in France (UNECA.ORG).

The amount of time spent collecting water takes women away from family and community.

TIME

TIME

Improved sanitation would give every household an additional 1,000 hours a year to work, study, and rest. The amount of time saved equates to an estimated US $100 billion each year (UN-Water, 2008). 

Time saved could be spent studying for a better future or developing small businesses to improve the local economy. 

DYSENTERY

DYSENTERY

Children are especially vulnerable to death from water-borne disease. 1.5 million children under the age of five die each year from diarrhea, caused primarily by dirty water and poor sanitation.  

This is the equivalent to the city of Barcelona, Spain. 

CHILDREN

CHILDREN

AROUND 315,000 CHILDREN UNDER-FIVE DIE EVERY YEAR FROM DIARRHOEAL DISEASES CAUSED BY DIRTY WATER AND POOR SANITATION. THAT'S ALMOST 900 CHILDREN PER DAY, OR ONE CHILD EVERY TWO MINUTES. (WASHWATCH.ORG)

If children are the future, what kind of future will they have without clean water?

suffering

SUFFERING

At any given time, ½ of the world’s hospital beds are occupied by people suffering from water and sanitation related illnesses. 

When adults are sick, children miss valuable school time to take over the household duties.

POLLUTION

POLLUTION

About 90% of sewage and 70% of industrial wastes in developing countries are discharged into water sources without treatment, often polluting the usable water supply (WSSCC, 2008). 

  In Canada, our water is put through extensive treatment before consumption.

danger

DANGER

Women and girls are regularly required to walk 6km to the nearest water source. 

This journey is often taken alone, placing them at risk of injury , animals and violence.

GIRLS

GIRLS 

Many schools are not equipped with private facilities for girls to use. 

If schools are equipped with safe, private sanitation facilities, girls will be much more likely to attend and stay in school.

school

SCHOOL

CLEAN WATER, BASIC SANITATION AND HYGIENE EDUCATION AT SCHOOLS ARE ESSENTIAL TO FOSTERING HEALTHY DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT IN CHILDREN. 

Without education, the cycle of poverty continues.

THEFUTURE

THE FUTURE

By 2050, the world's population is estimated to grow by three billion and 90% of this growth will be in the developing world.

Unless sustainable water solutions are secured fast, regions already stressed for safe water sources will be over capacity.

FOOD

FOOD

Feeding our world takes up to 90% of our freshwater withdrawals but many people in developing nations still don't have access to enough water for irrigation.

Lack of access to clean water also leads to famine and malnutrition.